Last edited by Kazihn
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Birmingham gun manufactory of Farmer and Galton and the slave trade in the eighteenth century. found in the catalog.

Birmingham gun manufactory of Farmer and Galton and the slave trade in the eighteenth century.

Walter Alan Richards

Birmingham gun manufactory of Farmer and Galton and the slave trade in the eighteenth century.

by Walter Alan Richards

  • 181 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Farmer & Galton (Firm).

  • Edition Notes

    Thesis (M.A.) -University of Birmingham, Dept of History.

    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20651295M

      During the eighteenth century, the Birmingham-based Farmer and Galton Gun Manufacturers produced thousands of firearms which were used by European merchants and African tribes in the trade and capture of slaves.   The British share of this European trade exceeded fifty percent. Recent quantitative analysis of the trade confirms a slave-for-guns trade cycle that created a vicious spiral of supply and demand: more and more guns (and gunpowder) for more and more slaves. 31 These exports were clearly not for potential enemies, but for African partners in trade.

    A report to Parliament in found that Birmingham had over 4, gunmakers, with , guns a year going to slave traders. Although Quakers were later leaders in the cause of abolition, one of the leading gun manufacturers in Birmingham was the Quaker firm of Farmer and Galton. It is known that that firm also sent a ship, the Perseverence.   Yes - but only in so far as it would help the inheritors of the wealth that was made from the slave trade - be they in Bristol, London, Manchester, Liverpool or Birmingham (where most of the.

      B'ham was home to a large and thriving gun manufacturing industry in what is known as the "gun quarter".There were many people working in it including several generations of the same probably worked for the same company. Thanks for the info about the gun quarter I love to read anything about it as I think Birmingham is so unique.   With this book, Priya Satia introduces Samuel Galton and the economies of guns and war into the historical equation and, with it, affirms her place as a deeply captivating and thought-provoking historian." (Caroline Elkins winner of the Pulitzer Prize Reviews:


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Birmingham gun manufactory of Farmer and Galton and the slave trade in the eighteenth century by Walter Alan Richards Download PDF EPUB FB2

The thesis begins by describing how the origins, growth and sales organisation of Farmer and Galton were rooted in the slave trade. The firm's position on the chief arms supplier to the Committee of the African Company is examined, and as arms supplier to some of the leading slave trading merchants of the mid-eighteenth by: 2.

The thesis begins by describing how the origins, growth and sales organisation of Farmer and Galton were rooted in the slave trade. The firm's position on the chief arms supplier to the Committee of the African Company is examined, and as arms supplier to some of the leading slave trading merchants of the mid-eighteenth : W.A.

Richards. Business correspondence of Samuel Galton and James Farmer, in particular, together with the largely financial business papers of Farmer & Galton, are a rich source for the study of the eighteenth. Farmer and Galton was probably the largest Birmingham gunmaking firm specializing in the African trade in the eighteenth century, and was the main supplier of arms to the Committee of the Company of Merchants Trading to Africa in the s.

For a history of the firm and its connection with the slave trade see Richards, W. by: The Galton family were Quakers and lived in Birmingham from the mid-eighteenth century.

Their gun manufacturing business, Farmer & Galton, prospered during the 18th century, supplying guns to merchants in Bristol and Liverpool.

The guns were then sold on the west coast of. The Birmingham gun trade was well established by the time the Napoleonic Wars broke out in Driven by technical innovators such as the Galton and Ketland families, the munitions industry helped to turn Birmingham and the Black Country into a global economic powerhouse which supplied weapons to the military – and for the slave trade.

Prof. David Williams Birmingham has been a key innovator in the gun trade since the seventeenth century and the Birmingham Gun Barrel Proof House operates to. In Samuel Galton junior’s father made his son manager of the Steelhouse Lane gun works, becoming an equal partner with his father in As manufacturers the Galtons worked very closely with Boulton and Watt.

During the s Samuel Galton junior began to attend Lunar Society meetings and several were held at his home in Great Barr. Many of the guns used by British troops during the Napoleonic Wars were manufactured in Birmingham by the Galton family.

The Galtons grew wealthy from the gun trade, but as the war with France intensified, their commercial prosperity set them on a collision course with the pacifist Quaker Society to which the family belonged.

In the same year the ‘Abolition of the Slave Trade Act’ was passed, Letters from England () by the poet Robert Southey publicly drew attention to Birmingham’s shameful legacy.

The Birmingham and Provincial Gun Trade in the 18th and 19th Century. Author: De Witt Bailey. Publisher: ISBN: Category: Firearms industry and trade. Page: View: Download Now. Empire of Guns uses the story of Galton and the gun trade, from Birmingham to the outermost edges of the British empire, to illuminate the nation's emergence as a global superpower, the roots of the state's role in economic development, and the origins of our era's debates about gun control and the "military-industrial complex" -- that thorny Reviews: The Gun Quarter is a district of the city of Birmingham, England, which was for many years a centre of the world's gun-manufacturing industry, specialising in the production of military firearms and sporting guns.

It is an industrial area to the north of the city centre, bounded by Steelhouse Lane, Shadwell Street and Loveday Street. The first recorded gun maker in Birmingham was inand locally made. Farmer and Galton’s main gun factory in Steelhouse Lane became the largest of the Birmingham gun makers.

This was and indeed remains, as it still goes on a little in today’s city, a complex trade, with many components manufactured by subcontractors in small workshops in Birmingham and the Black Country. Richards, W.A. The Birmingham gun manufactory of Farmer and Galton and the slave trade in the eighteenth century.

Langford in “A Century of Birmingham Life” () traces the origins of anti-slavery in the town to a visit by Thomas Clarkson, the campaigner against slavery in Clarkson’s visit did seem to act as a catalyst and he singled out local Quakers as especially supportive, but this was not the only factor.

The biggest gun-making firm in 18th century Britain was owned by a Quaker family, the Galtons of Birmingham. They were major suppliers of guns to the slave trade. By gunmakers Farmer & Galton were export guns a year to Africa, however an extract from Lady Shelburne’s diary doubted the quality of some of the guns destined for Africa.

Details of MS/C/D; Reference: MS/C/D Title: Letters to the Galton family Description: This section contains letters written to members of over four generations of the Galton family, including Samuel Galton; his brother John Galton; his wife Mary Galton (nee Farmer); his mother Sarah Galton; his sister Elizabeth Galton; his sister-in-law Hannah Galton, and his son Samuel Galton.

A gun manufacturer in Birmingham in the 19th century. As Satia dug deeper into Galton's history, her book became a much larger story of how warfare and firearm production was a hidden force in.

5 In the second half of the eighteenth century over 90 percent of the British African trade as recorded in the British Customs books was made up of slave trade.

See Inikori, J. E., “West African Import and Export Trade – Volume and Structure,” in Essays in Honour of Professor K. O. Dike, Ikime, Obaro, ed. (Ibadan, forthcoming).The British African trade during this period was.quality of the English gun trade with West Africa in the eighteenth century. Farmer and Galton was probably the largest Birmingham gunmaking firm specializing in the African trade in the eighteenth century, and was the main supplier of arms to the Committee of the Company of Merchants Trading to Africa in the IS.

For a history of the firm and.It was situated on Bull Street, one of Birmingham's oldest streets, and had probably been the home and retail premises of a wealthy merchant.

The eighteenth-century history of the Lamb House is little known, but in the early s it was taken over by William Suffield, a printer from Coventry, as a bookshop, stationers and printing establishment.